Newswala.net https://newswala.net Tue, 16 Jun 2020 19:52:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.2 Study MBBS in USA (Medicine in the US) https://newswala.net/study-mbbs-in-usa-medicine-in-the-us/ https://newswala.net/study-mbbs-in-usa-medicine-in-the-us/#respond Tue, 16 Jun 2020 19:47:36 +0000 http://wp3.uploadage.com/?p=1818 MBBS at the USA- Some things require a great deal of fire, campaigns commitment, and hard work. Education and not needing to examine the particular path that fulfils your fantasies is just one of these. Many aspiring pupils who would like to follow a career in the health care area are very passionate and committed to challenging work that will you’re sporting degree and a potential career in the realm of medicine. When there’s harder in researching medicine, the origin of destination!

International students would really like to provide a helping hand into the world and that confront challenging experiences would really like to research their own career by studying medication in the united states. It’s fairly a long and tough journey entirely rewarding. Let us explore studying medicine in the USA.


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Application Process to Study MBBS in US

Graduation – Prerequisite or Basic Eligibility

The requirement to apply for the medication in the usa differs from other foreign destinations. Before any global student applies to the medical college in the US we have to make sure they have finished graduation.

It’s not feasible for clinical aspirant was only completed the greater secondary faculty to use for MBBS in the united states. The minimum entrance requirement or the simple eligibility criteria to use to MBBS is graduation.

Here is the most common requirements for the medical colleges in the US which can vary with a few healthcare universities of colleges.

Additionally, the students should have studied science classes within their graduation flow. Leading medical schools in USA cooperation with mathematics as a significant subject.


MCAT – Medical College Admission Test

A fantastic score in MCAT test secures a chair to research MBBS at the US.

Consequently, in case you’ve qualifying and graduation MCAT score, then the next step would be sending the program to the Medical School you want to research in the united states.

Many cases international students are regarded as a drawback to the regional pupils, which would be the normal phenomena. Admission of applicants to study medication in any of their medical institution in the US is a really rigorous process for both regional students and global students.


Create a list of medical schools to shortlist the right one

Should you obtain high MCAT score or qualifying score, then begin your search to produce the list of health colleges in the united states.

Ensure that you research and gain a thorough comprehension of all medical colleges in the US you want to apply to research MBBS in the USA. Some medical colleges in the US don’t register international students. Additionally, the selection procedure slightly differs from some medical colleges. As an example, in case you’ve got graduation from the art area, there are numerous medical colleges which could enrol you.

The web is the ideal place to hunt, collect information, filter and review the healthcare schools with extreme relaxation. Proceed to the official sites of every medical college to get the authentic Details


MBBS in USA Application Form – AMCAS

As soon as you’ve shortlisted the medical colleges in US, another step would be sending the application type.

The Majority of the Healthcare colleges which enroll international students Permit You to apply through AMCAS and AACOMAS

  • AMCAS — American Medical College Application Service
  • AACOMAS — American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service

You may save yourself a great deal of time using through AMCAS.

The significant advantage of employing through these sites — such websites permits you to upload the recommendation correspondence via a third party connection interfolio.com, where your program will be sent together with the letter of advice.


AMCAS and AACOMAS – Online Application for Medical Study in the US

AMCAS – American Medical College Application Service

Pupils have to thank AMCAS for ruling out the issues in applying to this medical research in the united states.

International students, who want to perform MD from the US medical colleges, can send their application to numerous schools in the USA. AMCAS will send your program to the chosen medical schools. Is not it simple?

AMCAS is conducted by the Association of the American Medical Colleges to fulfil the criteria laid from the US medical instruction for choosing the ideal candidate. Students must make sure that they know the support provided by AMCAS.

 AACOMAS – American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service

AACOMAS is an elongated application form or variant developed for the students who would like to use to the Osteopathic medical schools alongside the exact same program.

You need to send the recommendations or letter by yourself. Aside from this facet, everything is taken care of by AACOMAS. This ceremony is produced by the non-profit firm, American Association of Colleges of Osteopaths.


Top Medical Colleges in the USA to Study Medicine

  • The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Harvard Medical School
  • University of California San Francisco
  • Baylor College of Medicine
  • Stanford University School of Medicine
  • Perelman School of Medicine
  • New York University School of Medicine
  • Boston University School of Medicine
  • Washington University School of Medicine

A Note to Remember for MBBS in USA

The national government must make sure they’ve enough physicians for the various localities which place a massive drawback to the international pupils. The selection of securing entry in the people Medical School in the US quite thin. But, international students are always able to use to research private schools that are actually expensive on the opposite hand. So every time a student selects a particular Medical School it is vital to consider the advantages and disadvantages in a birds’ view.


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What an international student can expect from medical schools in the US?

MBBS in USA duration– Duration of this medical study from the US takes approximately 4 years for completion. It’s followed with a residential application that runs from 3 to 7 decades. The pupils experience highly supervised training together with the option of the area they choose.

International Pupils also get a choice to expand their home plan from 1 to 4 years based on the taste to learn more knowledge and instruction. In this period 1 and do a fellowship program and additionally, sub specializes in some of those preferred fields of research.

Cost of Medical School – How much it cost to Study medicine in the US (MBBS in the USA)

International students don’t get any financial help from medical colleges in the USA. The entrance process also comes with a prerequisite at which you have to present your financial aid or signs that you have sufficient money to finance your expenses and education.

This usually means you ought to have allocated funds to your research with good evidence that varies from $50000 to $200000 before you get entrance.

The majority of the international students are acknowledged from the personal medical colleges in America, which literally raises the total price of MBBS research in the US.

If you’re able to afford the tuition fee together with other expenses, then you’re in the ideal stage. In the end, using a medical degree from the USA, you can practice your profession in any region of the planet.


Study MBBS in USA with Scholarship

Special scholarship applications are supplied to all international students. Pupils with a high score in USMLE class can avail scholarships to encourage their fund. Each year, 1000 pupils from overseas countries are supplied with scholarships. The entire sum allocated to the pupil is just 2 million US dollars.

Careers in Medicine after MBBS in USA

Benefits of studying MBBS in USA for Indian Students

You may locate several professions in the health care field for a professional physician in the business. An expert physician produces a whole lot of money, over any other profession. Likewise, when you are eligible from US, together with the worldwide accepted level and recognition, it gives you a well-rewarding and respectable career throughout your lifetime.


Who makes the right candidate for the medical degree in US

There are lots of enthusiastic foreign students how to first your career together with all the promising medical degree from reputed Medical School at the US. On the other hand, the length of the class followed by the home applications, the difficulty level of evaluations, of instruction and above the struggle in completing the analysis in the US makes it hard. On a very simple note researching medicine in the USA isn’t everybody’s cup of tea.

International students with real enthusiasm and that enjoys confronting all of the challenges with no fear along with fiscally strong background create the ideal candidate. Financial status is quite important as lots of international students fees at cost during the initial 4 decades.

Our Service

You’re good to go if you’re waiting to fulfil all of the challenges mentioned previously. Obviously, the planet’s best education does not come easy because MBBS in Medical School is the noblest level on earth. Get in touch with us 8177000509 for full advice and support to study MBBS at the USA.

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Insurance in the USA https://newswala.net/insurance-in-the-usa/ https://newswala.net/insurance-in-the-usa/#respond Sat, 13 Jun 2020 12:12:24 +0000 http://wp3.uploadage.com/?p=1809

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Insurance in the United States alludes to the market for hazard in the United States, the world’s biggest insurance showcase by premium volume.Of the $4.640 trillion of gross premiums composed worldwide in 2013, $1.274 trillion (27%) were written in the United States. Insurance, by and large, is an agreement where the safety net provider consents to redress or repay another gathering (the safeguarded, the policyholder or a recipient) for indicated shortfall or harm to a predetermined thing (e.g., a thing, property or life) from specific dangers or dangers in return for an expense (the insurance premium).

Insurance in the United States For instance, a property insurance company may consent to hold up under the hazard that a specific bit of property (e.g., a vehicle or a house) may endure a particular sort or kinds of harm or misfortune during a specific timeframe in return for an expense from the policyholder who might somehow or another be in charge of that harm or misfortune. That understanding appears as an insurance strategy.

The primary insurance company in the United States endorsed fire insurance and was shaped in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1735. In 1752, Benjamin Franklin helped structure a shared insurance company called the Philadelphia Contributionship, which is the country’s most seasoned insurance bearer still inactivity. Franklin’s company was the first to make commitments toward flame counteractive action. In addition to the fact that his companies caution against certain flame dangers, however, it additionally would not protect certain structures where the danger of flame was excessively incredible, for example, all wooden houses.

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The main stock insurance company shaped in the United States was the Insurance Company of North America in 1792. Massachusetts authorized the primary state law requiring insurance organizations to keep up sufficient holds in 1837. Formal guidelines of the insurance industry started decisively when the primary state magistrate of insurance was delegated in New Hampshire in 1851. In 1859, the State of New York delegated its very own official of insurance and made a state insurance division to move towards progressively extensive guideline of insurance at the state level. Insurance and the insurance industry has developed, expanded and grew essentially from that point forward.

Insurance organizations were, in huge part, disallowed from composing more than one line of insurance until laws started to allow multi-line contracts during the 1950s. From an industry commanded by little, nearby, single-line shared organizations and part social orders, the matter of insurance has developed progressively towards multi-line, multi-state, and even multi-national insurance aggregates and holding organizations State-based insurance administrative framework Verifiably, the insurance industry in the United States was managed solely by the individual state governments. The primary state magistrate of insurance was delegated in New Hampshire in 1851 and the state-based insurance administrative framework developed as fast as the insurance industry itself.

Prior to this period, insurance was basically controlled by the corporate sanction, state statutory law and true guideline by the courts in legal choices. Under the state-based insurance guideline framework, each state works autonomously to manage their own insurance markets, ordinarily through a state branch of insurance or division of insurance. Extending back similar to the Paul v. Virginia case in 1869, difficulties to the state-based insurance administrative framework have ascended from different gatherings, both inside and without the insurance industry. The state administrative framework has been depicted as unwieldy, repetitive, befuddling and expensive. The United States Supreme Court found in the 1944 instance of United States v.

South-Eastern Underwriters Association that the matter of insurance was liable to government guidelines under the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. The United States Congress, be that as it may, reacted very quickly with the McCarran-Ferguson Act in 1945. The McCarran-Ferguson Act explicitly gives that the guideline of the matter of insurance by the state governments is in the open intrigue. Further, the Act expresses that no bureaucratic law ought to be understood to discredit, weaken or supplant any law sanctioned by any state government to control the matter of insurance except if the administrative law explicitly identifies with the matter of insurance. An influx of insurance company bankruptcies during the 1980s started a recharged enthusiasm for government insurance guidelines, including new enactment for a double state and administrative arrangement of insurance dissolvability regulation. accordingly, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) embraced a few model changes for state insurance guideline, including

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As Italy Reopens, Tour Guides Plead for More Aid, and Tourists https://newswala.net/as-italy-reopens-tour-guides-plead-for-more-aid-and-tourists/ https://newswala.net/as-italy-reopens-tour-guides-plead-for-more-aid-and-tourists/#respond Wed, 10 Jun 2020 14:32:25 +0000 https://newswala.net/as-italy-reopens-tour-guides-plead-for-more-aid-and-tourists/ 2020-06-10 10:29:56
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ROME — A few dozen black-clothed tour guides and tour organizers twirled white umbrellas to the tune of “Singing in the Rain” outside the Pantheon, one of Rome’s greatest tourist attractions recently.

The problem was, there were very few tourists.

The Pantheon, an ancient Roman temple, was among a wave of attractions across Italy that reopened this month after the coronavirus lockdown. The flash mob of guides and organizers was one of several similar events held in various Italian cities this week to draw attention to the severe problems caused after tourism — usually a lifeline — was paralyzed by the pandemic.

In the days after some of the first lockdown restrictions were lifted, Italians relished the empty streets, rediscovering city monuments and museums that they would normally avoid because of long lines.

But even as travel restrictions are lifted throughout Europe, reluctance to travel outside national borders remains high. Forecasts for the number of airplane reservations to Italy suggest drops of 95.2 percent in June, 82.4 percent in July and 76.4 percent in August, compared to the same periods last year, according to Italy’s national tourism agency, ENIT.

That is nothing short of a disaster, according to the workers dancing outside the Pantheon, who feel they have been neglected by the government. Many are demanding subsidies for the coming season when most will be out of work.

“Without tourism, Italy dies,” chanted Ilenya Moro, a tour guide in Rome who helped organize the flash mob. After it ended, the participants marched to a nearby square in front of the Italian Parliament to continue making their grievances heard.

About 3.5 million people in Italy depend on tourism for their livelihoods, including taxi drivers, restaurateurs and waiters, hoteliers and the country’s 25,000 tour guides and 20,000 tour organizers. Tour guides and tour organizers often work on a freelance basis.

In 2018, tourism accounted for around 13.2 percent of Italy’s gross domestic product, contributing about 232 billion euros, or around $262 billion, according to ENIT. In 2019, more than 63 million foreigners traveled to Italy, a 2.3 percent increase from the previous year.

This year, ENIT has a grim outlook. Forecasts show a drop of 72.9 percent from May to October in the number of travelers from the United States alone, an important constituency. “Americans tend to be open and easy to get along with, and a lot of them want guided tours,” Ms. Moro said. Moreover, they tend to tip. “But not as well as they used to, money is tight everywhere,” she added.

In April, an Italian hoteliers’ association, Federalberghi, registered a 99.1 percent drop in foreign clients, compared to the same month a year earlier. Representatives have expressed concerns about the coming season.

As it is, only 40 percent of Italy’s hotels are operative, a Federalberghi spokeswoman said. Another group, Confturismo-Confcommercio, estimated that the hotel industry lost roughly €11 billion from March 1 to May 31, roughly the duration of the lockdown.

For Italy’s tour guides and tour organizers, the losses are no less significant.

“I have five children, a wife and am the only one who works,” said Stefano Pace, a tour guide who went to the flash mob in front of the Pantheon. “Until long-haul international flights return, we won’t have any work,” he said.

The government has already allocated some money to the tour guide sector — dipping into a pool of funds that guaranteed freelance workers €600 for March and €600 for April.

“But that doesn’t stretch very far,” Mr. Pace said.

In its latest financial decree, the government promised that it would distribute an additional €1,000 to freelance workers in May, but some have said that gaining access to the money will be unnecessarily complicated because of rules and restrictions.

“This will create situations of difficulty for many who won’t likely be working until next year,” said Giuliano Varchetta, who works as a tour organizer, a job that involves looking after logistics and accompanying visiting groups.

“Tourism is a particular industry, we won’t have a reprise until mass tourism is back,” said Mr. Varchetta, speaking at the protest in front of the Italian Parliament.

At the rally, demonstrators held up signs that read, “The first to stop, the last to start up” and “Italy has no guide.”

One of the speakers, Nadia Cicchinelli, said that even though Italy was the land of Michelangelo and Brunelleschi, the Italian government had spent more time concerned about the distance between umbrellas at the beach than on supporting the country’s countless monuments and museums.

“They only speak of that when they speak of tourism,” she said to cheers and hoots, referring to what she saw as a focus on beaches and coastal areas.

Margherita Capponi, founder of AGTA, a tourist guide union that organized the flash mob and protests on Tuesday, said, “We have asked the government to continue giving us €600 a month until next March, because there is no work.”

  • Updated June 5, 2020

    • Does asymptomatic transmission of Covid-19 happen?

      So far, the evidence seems to show it does. A widely cited paper published in April suggests that people are most infectious about two days before the onset of coronavirus symptoms and estimated that 44 percent of new infections were a result of transmission from people who were not yet showing symptoms. Recently, a top expert at the World Health Organization stated that transmission of the coronavirus by people who did not have symptoms was “very rare,” but she later walked back that statement.

    • How does blood type influence coronavirus?

      A study by European scientists is the first to document a strong statistical link between genetic variations and Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus. Having Type A blood was linked to a 50 percent increase in the likelihood that a patient would need to get oxygen or to go on a ventilator, according to the new study.

    • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

      The unemployment rate fell to 13.3 percent in May, the Labor Department said on June 5, an unexpected improvement in the nation’s job market as hiring rebounded faster than economists expected. Economists had forecast the unemployment rate to increase to as much as 20 percent, after it hit 14.7 percent in April, which was the highest since the government began keeping official statistics after World War II. But the unemployment rate dipped instead, with employers adding 2.5 million jobs, after more than 20 million jobs were lost in April.

    • Will protests set off a second viral wave of coronavirus?

      Mass protests against police brutality that have brought thousands of people onto the streets in cities across America are raising the specter of new coronavirus outbreaks, prompting political leaders, physicians and public health experts to warn that the crowds could cause a surge in cases. While many political leaders affirmed the right of protesters to express themselves, they urged the demonstrators to wear face masks and maintain social distancing, both to protect themselves and to prevent further community spread of the virus. Some infectious disease experts were reassured by the fact that the protests were held outdoors, saying the open air settings could mitigate the risk of transmission.

    • How do we start exercising again without hurting ourselves after months of lockdown?

      Exercise researchers and physicians have some blunt advice for those of us aiming to return to regular exercise now: Start slowly and then rev up your workouts, also slowly. American adults tended to be about 12 percent less active after the stay-at-home mandates began in March than they were in January. But there are steps you can take to ease your way back into regular exercise safely. First, “start at no more than 50 percent of the exercise you were doing before Covid,” says Dr. Monica Rho, the chief of musculoskeletal medicine at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab in Chicago. Thread in some preparatory squats, too, she advises. “When you haven’t been exercising, you lose muscle mass.” Expect some muscle twinges after these preliminary, post-lockdown sessions, especially a day or two later. But sudden or increasing pain during exercise is a clarion call to stop and return home.

    • My state is reopening. Is it safe to go out?

      States are reopening bit by bit. This means that more public spaces are available for use and more and more businesses are being allowed to open again. The federal government is largely leaving the decision up to states, and some state leaders are leaving the decision up to local authorities. Even if you aren’t being told to stay at home, it’s still a good idea to limit trips outside and your interaction with other people.

    • What’s the risk of catching coronavirus from a surface?

      Touching contaminated objects and then infecting ourselves with the germs is not typically how the virus spreads. But it can happen. A number of studies of flu, rhinovirus, coronavirus and other microbes have shown that respiratory illnesses, including the new coronavirus, can spread by touching contaminated surfaces, particularly in places like day care centers, offices and hospitals. But a long chain of events has to happen for the disease to spread that way. The best way to protect yourself from coronavirus — whether it’s surface transmission or close human contact — is still social distancing, washing your hands, not touching your face and wearing masks.

    • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

      Common symptoms include fever, a dry cough, fatigue and difficulty breathing or shortness of breath. Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. The C.D.C. has also added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

    • How can I protect myself while flying?

      If air travel is unavoidable, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself. Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A study from Emory University found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has recommended that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting new concerns that the coronavirus is being spread by infected people who have no symptoms. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.


“No one is traveling, Italians don’t want guided tours, and many museums aren’t letting us inside” with large groups, she added. “We’re going to need help until next year.”

To ensure social distancing, many Italian museums and archaeological sites allow a maximum of 10 people per guided tour.

“June is normally our best month, when we work the most, because clients from the United States begin to travel after schools close,” Ms. Capponi said.

But this year will be different.

Since the lockdown began, Ms. Capponi has worked one day — June 2 — taking a small group through the Vatican Museums, the day after the reopening. “And I am one of the few who has actually had a tour,” she said.

To help those in the greatest need, her organization set up an emergency fund for workers. “Some didn’t even have enough to eat,” she said.

At the Pantheon, a few locals wandered inside after having their temperatures checked. The cavernous interior would normally be swarmed by crowds.

A custodian there said that the Pantheon would sometimes welcome 30,000 visitors in a single day, but that’s no longer possible now that only 80 visitors are allowed inside at a time.

“From an economic point of view, for us, it’s a tragedy,” said Azzurra Mancini, a tour guide who had taken advantage of the protest to visit the ancient Roman temple. “The pandemic swept away the city’s thriving life,” she said. “I hope our dear Americans will soon be back with us.”

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Trump May Compare Himself to Nixon in 1968, but He Really Resembles Wallace https://newswala.net/trump-may-compare-himself-to-nixon-in-1968-but-he-really-resembles-wallace/ https://newswala.net/trump-may-compare-himself-to-nixon-in-1968-but-he-really-resembles-wallace/#respond Wed, 10 Jun 2020 14:30:18 +0000 https://newswala.net/trump-may-compare-himself-to-nixon-in-1968-but-he-really-resembles-wallace/ 2020-06-10 13:52:01
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President Trump said last month that he had “learned a lot from Richard Nixon,” and many interpreted his hard-line response to the street protests of recent days as a homage of sorts to the 1968 campaign. The president’s Twitter feed has been filled with phrases famous from the Nixon lexicon like “LAW & ORDER” and even “SILENT MAJORITY.”

But if anything, Mr. Trump seems to be occupying the political lane held that year by George Wallace, the segregationist former governor of Alabama who ran as a third-party candidate to the right of Nixon. While he does not share Wallace’s extreme positions, Mr. Trump is running hard on a combative pro-police, anti-protester platform, appealing to Americans turned off by unrest in the streets.

Mr. Trump’s talk of “shooting” looters, his bellicose denunciation of “thugs” and “terrorists,” his threats to unleash “vicious dogs” and “ominous weapons” and his vow to call in troops to “dominate” the streets all evoke Wallace’s inflammatory language more than Nixon’s that year. Mr. Trump has offered little empathy for the goals of peaceful protesters against racial injustice, emphasizing instead the sporadic looting and violence even as he has sought to discredit the victims of police brutality.

From the safety of his fortified White House, Mr. Trump has recirculated a Twitter post by a commentator saying it “sickens me” to suggest that George Floyd, the black man whose death under the knee of a white police officer in Minneapolis two weeks ago touched off protests around the world, be considered a martyr. And on Tuesday, he advanced a conspiracy theory aired by a broadcaster who has done freelance work for a Russian propaganda unit that implied with no basis in fact that a police assault on an unarmed protester in Buffalo was somehow a “set up.”

That sort of approach goes way beyond the 1968 campaign when in fact Nixon ran in the middle between Wallace on the right and Vice President Hubert Humphrey, the Democratic nominee, on the left. While Nixon spoke out strongly for law and order, he also spoke in favor of civil rights and preached the need for unity under a campaign slogan of “Bring Us Together.” While he condemned riots and student protesters, he marched in the funeral of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and lectured suburban audiences on their obligations to help the underprivileged.

“Nixon, a really shrewd political strategist, believed that the way to victory was through the suburbs where Wallace’s raw and often violent rhetoric alienated moderate Republicans,” said Dan T. Carter, a professor emeritus at the University of South Carolina and a Wallace biographer. “He sought to carefully balance his rhetoric between supporting law and order and condemning violent protests and riots while expressing concern about the conditions of black Americans and supporting peaceful protests.”

The lessons of 1968 have become the focus of much discussion in the two weeks since the killing of Mr. Floyd touched off a raw conversation about race in America that many have compared to that traumatic year a half-century ago. Much like then, a presidential campaign is taking place amid racial turmoil and anger in the streets — exacerbated in this case by a global pandemic and economic collapse rather than the high-profile assassinations and the increasingly unpopular Vietnam War that contributed to the sense of national unraveling that year.

Unlike Mr. Trump, Nixon was not running as the incumbent but as a former vice president from a previous administration headed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower that had passed a civil rights law and enforced desegregation in Southern schools. But the riots that followed Dr. King’s murder, the tumult of the antiwar movement and the violence at the Democratic convention created a great sense of unease in the country that Nixon sought to exploit.

“Law and order was the No. 1 domestic issue during the campaign, even overtaking Vietnam in most polls by November,” said Luke A. Nichter, a historian at Texas A&M University who along with Douglas Brinkley has published two books on Nixon’s tape-recorded conversations. “A candidate for county dogcatcher could not run in 1968 without having a position. Even Hubert Humphrey was talking about law and order by the end of the campaign.”

Patrick J. Buchanan, who later became a famous columnist, television commentator and three-time presidential candidate, wrote most of Nixon’s statements on law and order during the 1968 campaign and said on Tuesday that none of them were wildly controversial at the time.

Nixon came out hard against student protesters who took over the Columbia University campus that spring, and he gave anti-crime statements at most stops during a train trip through Ohio, Mr. Buchanan recalled. The candidate scoffed at the Kerner Commission report on race relations in the United States, saying that it “blames everybody for the riots except the perpetrators of the riots.”

In perhaps his most famous ad, Nixon showed images of screaming protesters and burning buildings as he intoned, “So I pledge to you, we shall have order in the United States.” But even then, historians noted, he sought to temper the message and avoid the overt racial appeals of Wallace, making sure that the faces of the protesters in the ad were white, not black.

“While R.N. was positioned as tough on law and order, he did not try to rival George Wallace, and Nixon’s campaign thrust was really ‘peace with honor’ in Vietnam and ‘new leadership’ which could unite the country,” Mr. Buchanan said by email. Referring to Ronald Reagan of California, he added, “In those years, Governor Reagan was more passionate and tougher on the law-and-order issue than R.N., who I think it is fair to say did what he had to do, but it was not why he was running for president.”

Wallace, by contrast, was happy to fire away at the protesters and did not shy away from racist appeals. Like Mr. Trump today, he talked of “anarchists” and boasted of a violent response to them should he be elected. “If any anarchists lie down in front of my automobile, it will be the last automobile they ever lie down in front of,” he said.

With the former Alabama governor in the race, Nixon all but wrote off the Deep South and concentrated instead on border states with a more subtle message to voters who might agree with Wallace, arguing that a vote for him was in effect a vote for Humphrey, an outspoken liberal and longtime champion of the civil rights movement and therefore unpopular with white Southerners.

Wallace ultimately won five states that otherwise might have gone to Nixon, who eked out a popular margin of just 0.7 percent of the vote while assembling a convincing victory in the Electoral College.

“Comparing Nixon to Trump does a disservice to Nixon, who beyond his own demons, was often a brilliant political strategist,” said Paul Stekler, the documentary maker who filmed “George Wallace: Settin’ the Woods on Fire” and founded the Center for Politics and Governance at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. “And in 1968, having Wallace in the race allowed him to triangulate — but it was a narrow path given how close the election ultimately was.”

John A. Farrell, the author of “Richard Nixon: The Life,” said the 37th president was both “the candidate for change as well as for tradition and order” in 1968. It was only after he won office that Nixon changed tacks, moving toward more polarizing appeals after he failed to bring the Vietnam War to a quick conclusion.

“In the fall of 1969, he decided that he could best profit by deliberately dividing Americans and pitting them against each other for his own political gain,” Mr. Farrell said.

While in the Oval Office, Nixon railed against protesters and his aides put together a program of secret domestic spying against activists. In May 1970, the White House had to be surrounded by buses to ward off demonstrations against his Cambodia incursion.

But he also wanted to reach out. One night a few days after the shooting of protesters at Kent State University, a sleepless Nixon asked to be taken at 4:35 a.m. to the Lincoln Memorial, where he talked extemporaneously with some of the young antiwar demonstrators. “I know probably most of you think I’m an S.O.B.,” he told them, by his account. “But I want you to know that I understand just how you feel.”

Still, the antipathy grew. By that September, Nixon was grousing again about the protesters to William Safire, his speechwriter. “On the kid thing — strong against bomb throwing,” Nixon said, according to Mr. Safire’s diary. “Strong against nonsense. Let the others say that life is hard for the little bastards, that we should listen to them. We have listened before and we will listen again — after the election.”

He framed the choice for Mr. Safire. “Anytime you talk Democrats vs. Republicans we lose,” he said. “Anytime you talk radicals vs. responsibles, we win.”

That is a formulation Mr. Trump would probably recognize today, and he too hopes it will be a winning one.


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Georgia’s Long Lines https://newswala.net/georgias-long-lines/ https://newswala.net/georgias-long-lines/#respond Wed, 10 Jun 2020 12:26:27 +0000 https://newswala.net/georgias-long-lines/ 2020-06-10 10:32:55
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Chloe Mexile Benard got in line to vote in the Atlanta suburbs at 7:30 a.m. yesterday, according to The Guardian. She did not vote until almost noon.

Marneia Mitchell, a stationery designer in Atlanta, was starting her fourth hour of waiting in line when she told The Times, “It’s despicable.”

And Greg Bluestein, a politics reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, called yesterday’s primary elections in Georgia “like nothing we’ve ever experienced.”

In several counties around Atlanta, voting machines malfunctioned, and thin staffing because of the coronavirus left fewer poll workers to deal with it. As a result, many Georgia residents had to choose between enduring hours in line or losing their right to vote.

Yesterday’s problems were worse than usual — partly a result of recently bought voting machines — but were also part of a much larger issue. In no other affluent country do citizens regularly have as hard a time voting as they do in the United States. Most of our elections are held on workdays, and a shortage of election equipment and workers often forces people to wait in long lines.

The waits tend to be longest for African-Americans. One study of the 2016 election, using smartphone location data, found that voters in black neighborhoods waited 29 percent longer on average than voters in white neighborhoods.

And as was the case in the 1950s and ’60s, Georgia has again become a battleground over voting rights. In the 2018 midterms, the state had the country’s longest waiting times, according to a Bipartisan Policy Center analysis. Republicans in Georgia, who control most of the state government, have frequently opposed efforts by Democrats to make voting more accessible.

It was not fully clear why yesterday’s lines were worse in the Atlanta area than elsewhere in Georgia. Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a Republican, blamed local officials — who are heavily Democratic — and said they had not properly trained election workers. Local officials, in turn, blamed him, saying he had not provided adequate training resources. Virus fears among election workers and high turnout, after George Floyd’s killing, may also have played a role.

“No corner of the state had a fully functional voting experience,” The Times reported. Michael McDonald, an elections expert at the University of Florida, wrote: “I have never seen the scale of election failures happening in Georgia today. This does not bode well for November.”

In yesterday’s election results:

Senate Republican leaders have assigned Tim Scott of South Carolina, their only black member, to lead the drafting of legislation that conservatives could rally behind.

Republicans face a dilemma: For decades, they have built an image as tough on crime, and it has helped them win many elections, often by winning the votes of whites who previously voted Democratic. But public opinion has shifted significantly, amid growing video evidence of police brutality and racism, and Republicans are trying to figure out how much to change their stance. For now, several congressional Republicans have changed their tone but not yet supported new policies.

In other politics news:

  • President Trump floated a false theory that a 75-year-old man in Buffalo who had been knocked to the ground by the police was “an ANTIFA provocateur.”

  • A group of white counterprotesters in New Jersey, appearing in front of a pro-Trump sign, mocked Floyd’s death, with one man kneeling on the neck of another who was facedown on the ground. One of the counterprotesters was a corrections officers and was quickly suspended.

  • Democrats are increasing their pressure on Joe Biden to pick a black running mate.


Two weeks after Floyd died at the hands of Minneapolis police officers, he was laid to rest in Houston, in a grave next to his mother’s. Two rows of police officers saluted as Floyd’s coffin went past. (The Times recently profiled Floyd’s life.)

As the service began, the New York Stock Exchange went silent for eight minutes, 46 seconds — the length of time a police officer held his knee on Floyd’s neck. It was the longest moment of silence on the stock exchange floor in its 228-year history.


Daily coronavirus deaths in Brazil are now the highest in the world. Investors are fleeing. And President Jair Bolsonaro and his allies are under investigation.

In response to the chaos, Bolsonaro is raising the prospect of military intervention to protect his grip on power — an ominous prospect for a country that was under a military dictatorship as recently as the 1980s.

More on the virus: A Times graphic compares the death toll to the toll from historical disasters.


  • The founder of CrossFit, Greg Glassman, has resigned, after BuzzFeed News published the details of a call with gym owners in which he maligned Floyd and shared coronavirus conspiracy theories.

  • Paramount Television canceled “Cops,” the once-popular reality show that ran for 33 seasons and that civil rights groups criticized for its portrayal of African-Americans. Separately, HBO pulled “Gone With the Wind” from its new streaming service, but pledged to bring back the 1939 film that romanticizes the Civil War-era South “with a discussion of its historical context.”

  • Lives lived: Bonnie Pointer was there at the creation, when she and her siblings decided to form a vocal group called simply the Pointer Sisters. But before the 1970s were out, she had left the group to pursue a solo career. And then they hit it big, without her. She has died at 69.

IBM announced this week that it opposes using facial recognition for mass surveillance and racial profiling. We talked to our colleague Shira Ovide, who writes The Times’s On Tech newsletter, about the problems with the technology.

“Facial recognition is terrible at identifying people with darker skin,” Shira said, pointing out that some research found it has no better than a 50-50 chance. “And there’s a dangerous tendency to over-rely on this kind of technology, even when it’s not accurate.”

She added: “We don’t know when facial recognition is misused. What if law enforcement agencies use it to identify people who are attending peaceful protests, like the ones happening now? Do we want to live in a surveillance state where everyone is in a vast database and we can be identified on sight at a massive scale?” That, of course, is the situation that China’s government is trying to create.

A key part of the Sikh religion is providing free meals as an act of faith, and many gurdwaras — the places of worship for Sikhs — have large kitchens, ample numbers of volunteers and regular food donations from community members. Some gurdwaras serve more than 100,000 people every day.

This tradition has enabled Sikh communities across the U.S. to respond to the increase in hunger caused by the pandemic, while many food banks have struggled, Priya Krishna writes.


In the publishing world, a viral hashtag this week encouraged black and nonblack authors to compare their pay, in an effort to highlight inequality. One example: A white science fiction writer said he had received $3.4 million for 13 books — more than $260,000 per novel — while a black female author said she had received $25,000 for each installment of her award-winning science fiction trilogy.

In theater, more than 300 artists — including stars like Viola Davis and Lin-Manuel Miranda — published a statement that outlined how artists of color are unjustly treated.


Inspired by this clever interactive from Bloomberg about the best streaming bundles, we asked Adrienne Maxwell, an editor at Wirecutter, to offer advice to anyone who’s gotten rid of cable television or is thinking of doing so:

When trying to decide whether or not to cut the cord and what services to subscribe to, I think the first question anyone should ask is whether they still want access to live TV and, especially, sports. Hardcore fans who love to watch a variety of sports and want access to their local affiliate broadcasts are probably better off sticking with cable.

If live TV is not something you care about, then it really does come down to personal viewing preferences. The beauty of streaming is that you aren’t locked into a contract, so you can subscribe to one service for a couple months, get caught up on their exclusive content that you love, then cancel and switch to another service.

But if you’re more of a “set it once and forget it” type, I’d say some combination of Netflix, Hulu, and Disney+ is likely to be the most satisfying for the most people.

Here is Wirecutter’s more detailed guide.



Here’s today’s Mini Crossword, and a clue: Only state with a two-vowel postal code (four letters).

You can find all of our puzzles here.


Thanks for spending part of your morning with The Times. See you tomorrow. — David

P.S. Cooking for kids can be exhausting, especially if they’re picky eaters. The Times’s Kim Severson and Ted Allen, the cooking-show host, can help. At 8 p.m. Eastern today, they’ll discuss how to cook healthy family meals.

You can see today’s print front page here.

Today’s episode of “The Daily” is about George Floyd’s funeral.

The Times is providing free access to much of our coronavirus coverage. Please consider supporting our journalism with a subscription.

Ian Prasad Philbrick and Sanam Yar contributed to The Morning. You can reach the team at themorning@nytimes.com.


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Coronavirus Live Updates: Tracking the Race for a Vaccine https://newswala.net/coronavirus-live-updates-tracking-the-race-for-a-vaccine/ https://newswala.net/coronavirus-live-updates-tracking-the-race-for-a-vaccine/#respond Wed, 10 Jun 2020 12:24:40 +0000 https://newswala.net/coronavirus-live-updates-tracking-the-race-for-a-vaccine/ 2020-06-10 12:10:58
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In the worldwide race for a vaccine, here’s where they stand.

Researchers around the world are developing more than 125 vaccines against the coronavirus. Vaccines typically require years of research and testing before reaching the clinic, but scientists are hoping to produce a safe and effective vaccine by next year.

The New York Times is following the status of those that have reached trials in humans.

There are three phases before a vaccine is approved for use, but some projects have combined early phase trials to speed up the process. Some coronavirus vaccines are now in Phase I/II trials, for example, in which they are tested for the first time on hundreds of people.

Additionally, the U.S. government’s Operation Warp Speed program has selected five vaccine projects to receive billions of dollars in federal funding and support before there’s proof that the vaccines work.

The world economy is facing the most severe recession in a century and could experience a halting recovery with a potential second wave of the virus and as countries embrace protectionist policies, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development warned in a new report.

A grim economic outlook released by the O.E.C.D. on Wednesday depicted a world economy that is walking on a “tightrope” as countries began to reopen after three months of lockdowns. Considerable uncertainty remains, however, as the prospects and timing of a vaccine remain unknown. Health experts fear that the spread of the virus could accelerate again later this year.

“Extraordinary policies will be needed to walk the tightrope towards recovery,” said Laurence Boone, the O.E.C.D.’s chief economist.

The O.E.C.D., which comprises 37 of the world’s leading economies, predicts that the global economy will contract by 6 percent this year if a second wave of the virus is avoided. If a second wave does occur, world economic output will fall 7.6 percent, before rebounding by 2.8 percent in 2021. The two scenarios are viewed as equally plausible.

The report is slightly more ominous than other recent forecasts from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.

The Fed will release economic projections and is expected to leave interest rates near zero.

There has not yet been a significant public debate over South Korea’s new tracking system, although that may come as the government rolls it out.

Since last month, South Korea has eased its social-distancing restrictions, saying it was confident in its virus-containment strategy. But it has also urged people to stick to preventive measures and said its goal is to keep the daily caseload below 50 until a vaccine is available.

South Korea’s daily caseload has fluctuated between 38 and 57 over the past week, and the country reported 50 new cases on Wednesday.

Here are other developments from around the world:

Mnuchin plans to paint an optimistic picture of the economy’s trajectory.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will defend the Trump administration’s efforts to prop up the economy on Wednesday, arguing that the extraordinary array of stimulus measures will set the stage for a dramatic recovery in the second half of the year.

Mr. Mnuchin, who will testify before the Senate’s small business committee, is expected to offer an optimistic outlook about the trajectory of the economy. He will highlight the recent employment figures that were better than expected and point to data that show Americans have been building their savings in recent months and will be ready to spend as the economy reopens.

“We remain confident that the overall economy will continue to improve dramatically in the third and fourth quarter,” Mr. Mnuchin will say, according to his prepared testimony.

The Treasury secretary will appear with Jovita Carranza, the administrator of the Small Business Administration, to update lawmakers on the status of the Paycheck Protection Program, a lending initiative that was created by Congress in March as a lifeline for small businesses, allowing them to pay workers and overhead during the shutdown.

The program, initially plagued by glitches and other problems, has approved about $510 billion of loans, and an additional $150 billion is available.

Lawmakers on the committee are expected to question Mr. Mnuchin and Ms. Carranza about what a next phase of the program might look like and what additional changes might be beneficial to small businesses.

They are also likely to face questions about measures to ensure that businesses owned minorities and women have sufficient access to loans. A report by the S.B.A.’s inspector general found last month that the administration failed to prioritize underserved groups in accordance with the legislation.

At a Brooklyn hospital, one last, loud cheer.

Now, with the outbreak in New York City vastly diminished and attendance at the nightly cheer dropping, the organizers threw a farewell party.

On Monday evening, as the nurses and doctors and orderlies filed out, a bagpiper played “Amazing Grace.” A medic gave a bouquet and a hug to one of the regular cheerleaders. The D.J. played “Last Dance,” and everyone did.

“It’s been so uplifting to have people give their time to come here and support us,” said Alyeshan Quinones, an E.R. nurse.

A study indicates Britain, where more than 40,000 have died from the virus, may have missed a chance to slow its assault.

Only “a tiny fraction” of the first virus cases in Britain came directly from China while a vast majority came via Europe, a study of the genetic lineages of virus samples has found.

The results suggest that Britain could have slowed the arrival of the virus by moving faster to advise against all nonessential overseas travel instead of only counseling against travel to mainland China, where the virus originated.

The study, which was posted on a virology website on Tuesday and has not been peer reviewed, is the latest indication that travel bans on China appear to have had little effect on mitigating the spread of the virus.

The authors of the study drew on research by Covid-19 Genomics U.K., a consortium of public and academic laboratories that is funded in part by the British government. The consortium has so far generated more than 20,000 genome sequences and identified 1,356 genetic lineages of the virus — that is, chains of infection stretching from patient to patient.

The study concluded that about 34 percent of the lineages detected had arrived from Spain, 29 percent from France, 14 percent from Italy and 23 percent from other countries.

The authors also estimate that 80 percent of “importation events” — new arrivals of the virus — took place during the one-month period between Feb. 28 and March 29.

Britain advised against nonessential travel to China on Jan. 28. But the government did not advise until March 17 against nonessential travel overseas

The authors note that as a result the volume of incoming arrivals remained high as the global rate of infection was soaring during the first half of that month.

“Notably there was a period in mid-March when inbound travel to the U.K. was still substantial and coincided with high numbers of active cases elsewhere,” the authors of the study wrote.

How the virus compares with 100 years of deadly events.

“Oh my goodness,” Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the top infectious disease expert in the United States, said Tuesday. “Where is it going to end? We’re still at the beginning of it.”

“It’s going to be different,” Salesforce’s chief executive, Marc Benioff, said. “It’ll be more sterile. It’ll be more hospital-like.”

Reporting was contributed by Choe Sang-Hun, Jonathan Corum, Abdi Latif Dahir, Sheri Fink, Josh Katz, David D. Kirkpatrick, Iliana Magra, Allison McCann, Richard C. Paddock, Alan Rappeport, Christopher F. Schuetze, Dera Menra Sijibat, Natasha Singer, Jenna Smialek, Kaly Soto, Jin Wu and Carl Zimmer.

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After 34 Years, Sweden Says It Knows the Killer of Olof Palme https://newswala.net/after-34-years-sweden-says-it-knows-the-killer-of-olof-palme/ https://newswala.net/after-34-years-sweden-says-it-knows-the-killer-of-olof-palme/#respond Wed, 10 Jun 2020 10:20:25 +0000 https://newswala.net/after-34-years-sweden-says-it-knows-the-killer-of-olof-palme/ 2020-06-10 09:58:00
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Bedeviled for over 34 years by the mysterious killing of Olof Palme, the Swedish prime minister who was shot in the back by an unknown assailant on a quiet Stockholm street, Sweden’s judiciary finally made its case on Wednesday.

At a news conference in Stockholm, the prosecutor Krister Petersson said that there was “reasonable evidence” that the assailant was Stig Engstrom, a graphic designer at an insurance company, who killed himself in 2000, at the age of 66. He added that only a court could rule on whether Mr. Engstrom was guilty or not, but that since the suspect is deceased, there would be no court case.

But the prosecutor said he also could not rule out the possibility that Mr. Engstrom had acted as part of a larger conspiracy.

Mr. Petersson said he had reached his conclusions after an exhaustive investigation that he compared to those of the Kennedy assassination and the downing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland.

As the cast of suspects waxed and waned, the case spawned numerous theories linking his death to dark, global conspiracies, many of them focused on South Africa.

It was Mr. Pettersson, a freelance journalist based in Gothenburg, who discovered that Mr. Engstrom had worked in a building near the theater where Mr. Palme was shot and had said he was present at the scene.

The journalist also found that Mr. Engstrom had been active in a shooting club, that he had political and private motives for killing Mr. Palme and that his personality matched a police profile of the likely killer. Mr. Engstrom was 52 at the time of the killing, and was frustrated with his lot in life.

“He had not advanced at his job,” Mr. Pettersson said in an interview. “He didn’t get the positions he felt he deserved. No family. No prospects in sight. So he was kind of a disappointed man at that point of his life.

“But he also had a drive to be recognized,” Mr. Petterson added. “To make something great of himself. He enjoyed every second of being in the media.”

At the time of the killing, investigators were focused on the suspected complicity of Kurdish militants, and Mr. Engstrom was not taken seriously, according to Mr. Pettersson.

Mr. Pettersson said he had investigated the case for 13 years before concluding that Mr. Engstrom was the killer.

“He has the right timing, the right clothing; he has unique information, he lied, he had close access to guns of the right type,” Mr. Pettersson said. “He was right-wing and Palme unfriendly,” he added. “He had a deep political interest and a deep anti-Palme sentiment.”

“It was a failure from the start,” she said in a phone interview. “Everything went wrong from the beginning.”

The crime scene wasn’t fenced off from the public, the alarm came late, there was chaos in the situation room, and reports were not properly documented, she said.

Making matters worse, the regional head of the police Hans Holmer, took charge of the initial investigation without clear authority, bypassing normal procedures, Ms. Ahlenius said.

“What should’ve been done by the attorney general and the prosecutor was done by one man who only did that because he was a charismatic figure,” she said.

A year was lost, and Mr. Engstrom was never questioned.

“When I now read the documentation, he early on presented himself as an important witness,” Ms. Ahlenius said.

Mr. Engstrom’s former wife, whom he divorced in 1999, dismissed the idea of his involvement in the killing of the prime minister.

“It is out of the question,” she told the newspaper Expressen in 2018. “He was not that kind of person, that’s for sure. He was too much of a coward. He wouldn’t harm a fly.” The Swedish news media are not identifying her by name.

A known petty criminal called Christer Pettersson (no relation to the journalist) was jailed for life in 1989 over the assassination, but he won an appeal later that year and died in 2004.

Mr. Engstrom even testified in defense of Christer Pettersson.

“In some ways it was a stroke of genius, because Engstrom placed himself as a witness,” said Mr. Pettersson, the journalist. “Each time he told his story, he established himself as a witness and made it more difficult for the real witnesses of the crime scene and investigators.”

His motive?

Mr. Pettersson, the journalist: “He wanted attention.”

The prosecutor, Mr. Petersson, acknowledged that there was a chance that his finding would not be accepted by the general public. “It has been enough for us to present this case,” he said. “We can’t stop anyone from having opinions about what we have found.”

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HBO Max Pulls ‘Gone With the Wind,’ Citing Racist Depictions https://newswala.net/hbo-max-pulls-gone-with-the-wind-citing-racist-depictions/ https://newswala.net/hbo-max-pulls-gone-with-the-wind-citing-racist-depictions/#respond Wed, 10 Jun 2020 10:18:33 +0000 https://newswala.net/hbo-max-pulls-gone-with-the-wind-citing-racist-depictions/ 2020-06-10 09:09:00
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HBO Max has removed from its catalog “Gone With the Wind,” the 1939 movie long considered a triumph of American cinema but one that romanticizes the Civil War-era South while glossing over its racial sins.

The streaming service pledged to eventually bring the film back “with a discussion of its historical context” while denouncing its racial missteps, a spokesperson said in a statement on Tuesday.

Set on a plantation and in Atlanta, the film won multiple Academy Awards, including best picture, and remains among the most celebrated movies in cinematic history. But its rose-tinted depiction of the antebellum South and its blindness to the horrors of slavery have long been criticized, and that scrutiny was renewed this week as protests over police brutality and the death of George Floyd continued to pull the United States into a wide-ranging conversation about race.

“‘Gone With the Wind’ is a product of its time and depicts some of the ethnic and racial prejudices that have, unfortunately, been commonplace in American society,” an HBO Max spokesperson said in a statement. “These racist depictions were wrong then and are wrong today, and we felt that to keep this title up without an explanation and a denouncement of those depictions would be irresponsible.”

HBO Max, owned by AT&T, pulled the film on Tuesday, one day after John Ridley, the screenwriter of “12 Years a Slave,” wrote an op-ed in The Los Angeles Times calling for its removal. Mr. Ridley said he understood that films were snapshots of their moment in history, but that “Gone With the Wind” was still used to “give cover to those who falsely claim that clinging to the iconography of the plantation era is a matter of ‘heritage, not hate.’”

“It is a film that, when it is not ignoring the horrors of slavery, pauses only to perpetuate some of the most painful stereotypes of people of color,” he wrote.

By several measures, the film was one of the most successful in American history. It received eight competitive Academy Awards and remains the highest-grossing film ever when adjusting for inflation. In 1998, it placed sixth on the American Film Institute’s list of greatest films of all time.

There was little criticism of the film when it was released, though in 1939 an editorial board member of The Daily Worker, a newspaper published by the Communist Party USA, called it “an insidious glorification of the slave market” and the Ku Klux Klan.

But the world in which it is viewed has changed, and with each decade discomfort has grown as people revisit its racial themes and what was omitted. In 2017, the Orpheum theater in Memphis said it would stop showing the film, as it had done each year for 34 years, after receiving complaints from patrons and other commenters. The president of the theater said it could not show a film “that is insensitive to a large segment of its local population.”

Based on a 1936 book by Margaret Mitchell, the film chronicles the love affair of Scarlett O’Hara, the daughter of a plantation owner, and Rhett Butler, a charming gambler. Critics have long said that the slaves are depicted as well-treated, content and loyal to their masters, a trope that rewrites the reality of how enslaved people were forced to live. Hattie McDaniel became the first African-American to win an Oscar by playing Mammy, an affable slave close to Scarlett O’Hara.

The nationwide protests of recent weeks have caused other entertainment companies to reconsider how their content is viewed in the current climate. The Paramount Network said on Tuesday that it had removed “Cops,” the long-running reality show that glorified police officers, from its schedule before its 33rd season.

There have also been similar moves in Britain. On Monday, the BBC removed episodes of the comedy series “Little Britain” — which featured one character in blackface — from its streaming service.

“Times have changed since ‘Little Britain’ first aired so it is not currently available on BBC iPlayer,” a BBC spokesperson said. The show had already been removed from Netflix and was also taken off the BritBox streaming service.

“Little Britain,” which was shown in the early 2000s, was created by David Walliams and Matt Lucas. Mr. Lucas, who was recently named the new host of “The Great British Baking Show,” has said in interviews that he would not make “Little Britain” today.

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RIO DE JANEIRO — As the coronavirus tore through Brazil, President Jair Bolsonaro came under blistering criticism for sabotaging the isolation measures imposed by states, encouraging mass rallies by his supporters and lashing out on the soaring death toll, saying, “What do you want me to do?”

Now that the outbreak in Brazil has gotten even worse — with more infections than any country but the United States — Mr. Bolsonaro’s government has come up with a unique response to the growing alarm: It decided to stop reporting the cumulative toll of the virus altogether.

Brazil’s health ministry took down the website where it had been reporting coronavirus statistics on Friday. And then, when it came back online on Saturday, the site omitted the historical data — leaving out how many people had already been infected or killed because of the virus.

Lawmakers and health experts quickly attacked Mr. Bolsonaro in unusually blistering terms. Not only did they condemn the government’s decision to withhold comprehensive statistics as deaths and contagion continue to soar, but they roundly criticized the Bolsonaro administration’s repeated practice of playing down the danger of the virus, regardless of what scientists and his own health ministers may say.

Gilmar Mendes, a Supreme Court justice, called the government’s “manipulation of statistics a tactic of totalitarian regimes,” adding that the “trick will not absolve the government from an eventual genocide.”

The pandemic — and, specifically, the government responses to them — have been highly contentious around the world. But in few places have the issues been quite as polarizing as in Brazil, a country already separated by a political chasm between Mr. Bolsonaro’s furious detractors and equally fervent devotees.

Mr. Bolsonaro, who initially described the virus as a “measly flu,” says the challenge of the virus is dwarfed by the economic fallout of stay-at-home measures, and that the real danger is the rising unemployment that will leave people hungry.

But he has also come under withering criticism for joining large pro-government protests that risk spreading the virus, for ordering the armed forces to mass produce an unproven medication for the virus, hydroxychloroquine, and for fighting with his own health officials as the crisis intensified.

Now Brazil is suffering the highest daily number of deaths in the world — often over 1,000 a day — and the government has stopped reporting the cumulative toll of the outbreak.

“By altering the numbers, the health ministry is trying to cover the sun with a sieve,” Rodrigo Maia, the Speaker of the lower House of Congress said in a message on Twitter posted shortly after midnight on Monday. “It is urgent to restore the credibility of statistics. A ministry that distorts numbers creates a parallel universe to avoid facing the reality of facts.”

Carlos Wizard Martins, a businessman who was recently tapped to help lead the government’s response, told the newspaper O Globo last week that the country’s coronavirus statistics were being audited because federal officials believed that states were reporting inflated figures in an effort to secure more funding.

That explanation, which was not supported by evidence, was broadly seen as the government’s latest misstep in its response to the outbreak.

The health ministry has been rocked by personnel turnover in recent weeks as the virus took hold in Brazil. Mr. Bolsonaro fired one health minister, Luiz Henrique Mandetta, in mid-April after the two clashed over the president’s disdain for social distancing measures that the ministry and state governors were promoting.

Then the health minister’s successor, Nelson Teich, quit after less than a month on the job, leaving the ministry in the command of an active duty general with no health care experience.

The government on Sunday issued two different figures on the latest daily death toll, initially reporting 1,382 fatalities, only to revise that number to 525. The ministry said the early figure included erroneously reported deaths.

The health ministry on Sunday also said in a statement that its new record-keeping method would provide “a more realistic snapshot of what is happening at the national level.”

  • Updated June 5, 2020

    • Does asymptomatic transmission of Covid-19 happen?

      So far, the evidence seems to show it does. A widely cited paper published in April suggests that people are most infectious about two days before the onset of coronavirus symptoms and estimated that 44 percent of new infections were a result of transmission from people who were not yet showing symptoms. Recently, a top expert at the World Health Organization stated that transmission of the coronavirus by people who did not have symptoms was “very rare,” but she later walked back that statement.

    • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

      The unemployment rate fell to 13.3 percent in May, the Labor Department said on June 5, an unexpected improvement in the nation’s job market as hiring rebounded faster than economists expected. Economists had forecast the unemployment rate to increase to as much as 20 percent, after it hit 14.7 percent in April, which was the highest since the government began keeping official statistics after World War II. But the unemployment rate dipped instead, with employers adding 2.5 million jobs, after more than 20 million jobs were lost in April.

    • Will protests set off a second viral wave of coronavirus?

      Mass protests against police brutality that have brought thousands of people onto the streets in cities across America are raising the specter of new coronavirus outbreaks, prompting political leaders, physicians and public health experts to warn that the crowds could cause a surge in cases. While many political leaders affirmed the right of protesters to express themselves, they urged the demonstrators to wear face masks and maintain social distancing, both to protect themselves and to prevent further community spread of the virus. Some infectious disease experts were reassured by the fact that the protests were held outdoors, saying the open air settings could mitigate the risk of transmission.

    • How do we start exercising again without hurting ourselves after months of lockdown?

      Exercise researchers and physicians have some blunt advice for those of us aiming to return to regular exercise now: Start slowly and then rev up your workouts, also slowly. American adults tended to be about 12 percent less active after the stay-at-home mandates began in March than they were in January. But there are steps you can take to ease your way back into regular exercise safely. First, “start at no more than 50 percent of the exercise you were doing before Covid,” says Dr. Monica Rho, the chief of musculoskeletal medicine at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab in Chicago. Thread in some preparatory squats, too, she advises. “When you haven’t been exercising, you lose muscle mass.” Expect some muscle twinges after these preliminary, post-lockdown sessions, especially a day or two later. But sudden or increasing pain during exercise is a clarion call to stop and return home.

    • My state is reopening. Is it safe to go out?

      States are reopening bit by bit. This means that more public spaces are available for use and more and more businesses are being allowed to open again. The federal government is largely leaving the decision up to states, and some state leaders are leaving the decision up to local authorities. Even if you aren’t being told to stay at home, it’s still a good idea to limit trips outside and your interaction with other people.

    • What’s the risk of catching coronavirus from a surface?

      Touching contaminated objects and then infecting ourselves with the germs is not typically how the virus spreads. But it can happen. A number of studies of flu, rhinovirus, coronavirus and other microbes have shown that respiratory illnesses, including the new coronavirus, can spread by touching contaminated surfaces, particularly in places like day care centers, offices and hospitals. But a long chain of events has to happen for the disease to spread that way. The best way to protect yourself from coronavirus — whether it’s surface transmission or close human contact — is still social distancing, washing your hands, not touching your face and wearing masks.

    • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

      Common symptoms include fever, a dry cough, fatigue and difficulty breathing or shortness of breath. Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. The C.D.C. has also added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

    • How can I protect myself while flying?

      If air travel is unavoidable, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself. Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A study from Emory University found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has recommended that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting new concerns that the coronavirus is being spread by infected people who have no symptoms. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.


The government did not explain its new methodology for tracking cases.

Over the weekend, the National Council of Health Secretaries, which represents local health officials, launched a website compiling comprehensive data. According to that tally, as of Sunday Brazil had more than 680,400 confirmed coronavirus cases and at least 36,151 deaths.

The council responded with indignation to the accusation that state officials were providing fictitious numbers for monetary gain, referring to the allegation leveled by Mr. Wizard.

Over the weekend, outraged Brazilians called for a boycott of Mr. Wizard’s businesses. On Sunday night, Mr. Wizard announced he would step down from his role in government.

“I apologize for any statement I have made that could have been interpreted as disrespectful toward the relatives of victims of Covid-19 or health professionals who have embraced the noble mission of saving lives,” he said in a statement.

Brazil, which has a robust public health care system, has historically excelled at epidemiological surveillance. If anything, experts said that a rigorous audit of Covid-19 cases would reveal that the disease has killed more people than the official data has captured because testing has been severely limited. An analysis by the Times found that in Manaus, a metropolis deep in the Amazon, the number of deaths in April was three times its historical average for the month.

“The tampering of pandemic data by the Ministry of Health is, to say the least, distressful,” said Denise Garrett, a Brazilian American epidemiologist who worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more than two decades. “The data should be communicated in a transparent, accurate and timely manner. This is crucial for decision-making and also of utmost importance to avoid public confusion.”

Manuela Andreoni and Letícia Casado contributed reporting.


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Brazil Coup: Threats Rattle Bolsonaro as Coronavirus Deaths Surge https://newswala.net/brazil-coup-threats-rattle-bolsonaro-as-coronavirus-deaths-surge/ https://newswala.net/brazil-coup-threats-rattle-bolsonaro-as-coronavirus-deaths-surge/#respond Wed, 10 Jun 2020 08:12:03 +0000 https://newswala.net/brazil-coup-threats-rattle-bolsonaro-as-coronavirus-deaths-surge/ 2020-06-10 05:00:14
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The threats are swirling around the president: Deaths from the virus in Brazil each day are now the highest in the world. Investors are fleeing the country. The president, his sons and his allies are under investigation. His election could even be overturned.

The crisis has grown so intense that some of the most powerful military figures in Brazil are warning of instability — sending shudders that they could take over and dismantle Latin America’s largest democracy.

But far from denouncing the idea, President Jair Bolsonaro’s inner circle seems to be clamoring for the military to step into the fray. In fact, one of the president’s sons, a congressman who has praised the country’s former military dictatorship, said a similar institutional break was inevitable.

“It’s no longer an opinion about if, but when this will happen,” the president’s son, Eduardo Bolsonaro, recently told a prominent Brazilian blogger, warning of what he called a looming “rupture” in Brazil’s democratic system.

The standoff traces an ominous arc for Brazil, a country that shook off military rule in the 1980s and built a thriving democracy in its wake. Within two decades, Brazil had come to represent the energy and promise of the developing world, with a booming economy and the right to host the World Cup and the Olympics.

Since then, its economy has faltered, corruption scandals have toppled or ensnared many of its leaders and an impeachment battle ousted its powerful leftist government.

Mr. Bolsonaro, a former Army captain, stepped into this tumult, celebrating the country’s military past and promising to restore order. But he has come under blistering criticism for downplaying the virus, sabotaging isolation measures and cavalierly presiding over one of the highest death tolls in the world, saying, “We are sorry for all the dead, but that’s everyone’s destiny.”

He, his family and his supporters are also being pursued on allegations like abuse of power, corruption and illegally spreading misinformation. Yet nearly half of his cabinet is made up of military figures, and now, critics contend, he is relying on the threat of military intervention to ward off challenges to his presidency.

A retired general in Mr. Bolsonaro’s cabinet, Augusto Heleno, the national security adviser, shook the nation in May when he warned of “unpredictable consequences for national stability” after the Supreme Court let an inquiry into Mr. Bolsonaro’s supporters move forward.

Mr. Bolsonaro, who still draws support from about 30 percent of Brazilians, already casts himself as the embodiment of Brazilian military culture, and portrays the armed forces as ethical and efficient managers.

Brazil’s armed forces already exercise exceptional influence in his government. Military figures, including retired four-star generals, account for 10 of 22 ministers in the cabinet. The government has named nearly 2,900 other active-duty members of the military to administration posts.

The clout of Brazil’s armed forces was on display when congressional leaders mostly exempted them from a 2019 pensions overhaul, allowing members of the military to avoid the deeper benefits cuts endured by other parts of society.

Mr. Bolsonaro’s pandemic response showcased the military’s rising profile in his government — as well the risks for leaders of the armed forces when Brazilians start ascribing blame as things go badly awry.

Building on Brazil’s public health successes in fighting previous epidemics, the Health Ministry pushed early on in the crisis for social distancing measures to slow the virus’s spread.

Even Mr. Bolsonaro seemed on board with the approach, dissuading followers from attending street rallies. Then he abruptly changed his stance, fist-bumping supporters outside his palace.

Mr. Bolsonaro also shifted leadership of the pandemic response to another general, Walter Souza Braga Netto, his chief of staff.

Sidelined and balking at expanding the use of hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug promoted by Mr. Bolsonaro that has not been proven effective against the virus, the health minister was replaced. His successor lasted only a few weeks until he resigned, replaced by an army general, Eduardo Pazuello.

One former official in the health ministry said the abrupt changes created a sense of chaos within the agency, resulting in weeks of dysfunction and paralysis at the most crucial time — when the country should have been fighting the uncontrolled spread of the virus.

  • Updated June 5, 2020

    • Does asymptomatic transmission of Covid-19 happen?

      So far, the evidence seems to show it does. A widely cited paper published in April suggests that people are most infectious about two days before the onset of coronavirus symptoms and estimated that 44 percent of new infections were a result of transmission from people who were not yet showing symptoms. Recently, a top expert at the World Health Organization stated that transmission of the coronavirus by people who did not have symptoms was “very rare,” but she later walked back that statement.

    • How does blood type influence coronavirus?

      A study by European scientists is the first to document a strong statistical link between genetic variations and Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus. Having Type A blood was linked to a 50 percent increase in the likelihood that a patient would need to get oxygen or to go on a ventilator, according to the new study.

    • How many people have lost their jobs due to coronavirus in the U.S.?

      The unemployment rate fell to 13.3 percent in May, the Labor Department said on June 5, an unexpected improvement in the nation’s job market as hiring rebounded faster than economists expected. Economists had forecast the unemployment rate to increase to as much as 20 percent, after it hit 14.7 percent in April, which was the highest since the government began keeping official statistics after World War II. But the unemployment rate dipped instead, with employers adding 2.5 million jobs, after more than 20 million jobs were lost in April.

    • Will protests set off a second viral wave of coronavirus?

      Mass protests against police brutality that have brought thousands of people onto the streets in cities across America are raising the specter of new coronavirus outbreaks, prompting political leaders, physicians and public health experts to warn that the crowds could cause a surge in cases. While many political leaders affirmed the right of protesters to express themselves, they urged the demonstrators to wear face masks and maintain social distancing, both to protect themselves and to prevent further community spread of the virus. Some infectious disease experts were reassured by the fact that the protests were held outdoors, saying the open air settings could mitigate the risk of transmission.

    • How do we start exercising again without hurting ourselves after months of lockdown?

      Exercise researchers and physicians have some blunt advice for those of us aiming to return to regular exercise now: Start slowly and then rev up your workouts, also slowly. American adults tended to be about 12 percent less active after the stay-at-home mandates began in March than they were in January. But there are steps you can take to ease your way back into regular exercise safely. First, “start at no more than 50 percent of the exercise you were doing before Covid,” says Dr. Monica Rho, the chief of musculoskeletal medicine at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab in Chicago. Thread in some preparatory squats, too, she advises. “When you haven’t been exercising, you lose muscle mass.” Expect some muscle twinges after these preliminary, post-lockdown sessions, especially a day or two later. But sudden or increasing pain during exercise is a clarion call to stop and return home.

    • My state is reopening. Is it safe to go out?

      States are reopening bit by bit. This means that more public spaces are available for use and more and more businesses are being allowed to open again. The federal government is largely leaving the decision up to states, and some state leaders are leaving the decision up to local authorities. Even if you aren’t being told to stay at home, it’s still a good idea to limit trips outside and your interaction with other people.

    • What’s the risk of catching coronavirus from a surface?

      Touching contaminated objects and then infecting ourselves with the germs is not typically how the virus spreads. But it can happen. A number of studies of flu, rhinovirus, coronavirus and other microbes have shown that respiratory illnesses, including the new coronavirus, can spread by touching contaminated surfaces, particularly in places like day care centers, offices and hospitals. But a long chain of events has to happen for the disease to spread that way. The best way to protect yourself from coronavirus — whether it’s surface transmission or close human contact — is still social distancing, washing your hands, not touching your face and wearing masks.

    • What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

      Common symptoms include fever, a dry cough, fatigue and difficulty breathing or shortness of breath. Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. The C.D.C. has also added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

    • How can I protect myself while flying?

      If air travel is unavoidable, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself. Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A study from Emory University found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has recommended that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting new concerns that the coronavirus is being spread by infected people who have no symptoms. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.


Separately, Luiz Henrique Mandetta, the health minister at the start of the pandemic, said that Mr. Bolsonaro prized economic stability over health priorities, preferring a military figure at the ministry’s helm.

“He needed someone like a general or a colonel who saw the ministry as a steppingstone, a way to get a promotion for bravery,” Mr. Mandetta said.

Brazil now has more than 700,000 confirmed coronavirus cases, second only to the United States. At least 37,000 people have died from the virus in Brazil as of Tuesday, with the death count often climbing by more than 1,000 a day.

The upheaval in Brazil is leading investors to rush for the exits. Capital flight is reaching levels unseen since the 1990s. The World Bank expects the economy to contract 8 percent this year. Car production, a once-thriving pillar of the economy, has plummeted to its lowest level since the 1950s.

Carlos Fico, a historian at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro who studies the Brazilian military, said the growing power of the armed forces carried the risk of revealing their incompetence in crucial areas.

“They think that bombastic declarations will make things happen as in the military realm, where an order is given and those of lower rank obey,” Mr. Fico said.

But with the military now guiding the pandemic response, Mr. Fico added, “They’re running the risk of being blamed by society for what happens next.”

Top allies of Mr. Bolsonaro insist that the armed forces have no plans for a coup. “Not one four-star general is in favor of military intervention,” said Sostenes Cavalcante, a right-wing congressman.

But in the same breath, Mr. Cavalcante argued that something must be done to curb the power of the Supreme Court. He contended that the talk of a coup by Mr. Bolsonaro’s son was merely a way of pressuring the judiciary.

“You could interpret that as the Supreme Court having overstepped its authority,” Mr. Cavalcante said.

At the same time, some officials within Mr. Bolsonaro’s administration are actively examining scenarios in which the military might intervene. One military official in the government who was not authorized to speak publicly said an intervention remained off the radar for now, but that certain moves by the judiciary, such as ordering a search of Mr. Bolsonaro’s palace as part of an investigation, could change that.

Similarly, the official added, any potential annulment of the 2018 election by a judge would also be considered unacceptable, because it would remove not only Mr. Bolsonaro, but also his running mate and vice president, Hamilton Mourão, a retired general.

Mr. Mourão has repeatedly asserted that no kind of military takeover is under consideration. But even the debate over military intervention is raising concern about the resilience of Brazil’s democratic institutions and a return to chronic political instability, with constant military meddling.

Fernando Henrique Cardoso, a former civilian president who was exiled during the military dictatorship, said he didn’t think a coup was imminent. But he worried that Mr. Bolsonaro’s intimidation tactics could intensify.

“How do democracies die? You don’t need a military coup,” Mr. Cardoso, 88, who has already urged Mr. Bolsonaro to resign, told reporters. “The president himself can seek extraordinary powers, and he can take them.”

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